Tag Archives for " Paul McCartney "

The Beatles “Day Tripper” Isolated Bass And Drums

beatles day tripperIt’s always a treat to hear the isolated tracks from a hit, especially when they’re from the old days of extreme tape machine limitations. The Beatles “Day Tripper” is an excellent example of how great a recording could be with only 4 tracks as we listen to the isolated bass and drums from the song. Of course, the magic is all in the song and you can certainly hear that in the recording. Here are some things to listen for.

1. The sound of the bass. It’s pretty woofy and not too defined like it would be in later recordings, but actually works in the track pretty well in when mixed with everything else. The bass sounds pretty bad by itself, which proves the point that sometimes relying on the solo button isn’t exactly the best thing for a mix.

2. There’s a lot of leakage. That would make producers, engineers and players crazy today but it was just standard operating procedure back then. No big deal, you just make it work for you.

3. The B-section bass changes. Paul McCartney plays a different part on each of the three B-sections, but each one of them is brilliant and works as well as the previous one. I wonder if this was planned or just happened spontaneously?

4. The drum B-section snare. Ringo play’s a little pickup snare fill on the second half of the B-section that almost sounds like a mistake. it’s a tad slow, as are the fills and builds, but it actually works well against the other tracks.

5. The bass line on the outro. It’s also a little different from what you’re used to hearing. It actually sounds like this version of “Day Tripper” might either be an outtake or the song was edited to make it a bit longer on the final version.

6. There’s an ending. You don’t hear it on the record but there’s one there if you listen to the end.

May 26, 2016

Paul McCartney: Chaos And Creation At Abbey Road

Paul McCartney Abbey RoadA few years ago I was speaking with an accomplished songwriter friend and I told him that I had just seen Paul McCartney in concert and how it was an 11 on a scale of 10. ” Of course, that’s like seeing Beethoven,” he replied. Yeah, Sir Paul may eventually be viewed that way, but no matter how you look at his career, he’s given us some of the most memorable and enjoyable music ever.

Here’s a great video of a television show that Paul did at Abbey Road Studios where he talks about how he came up with the idea for many of his songs (like “Blackbird,” “Lady Madonna,” and especially, the Mellotron part in “Strawberry Fields”).

It’s very cool to see some of the old Abbey Road gear, as Paul plays bits from his famous and latest tunes (this was more or less a promo for his latest album at the time). He also builds a song up from scratch where he plays all the instruments.

The Beatles “Drive My Car” Isolated Bass

Isolated BassPaul McCartney is one of the most influential bass players ever, and it’s always very cool to be able to listen to his isolated bass tracks. Today we’ll take a listen to The BeatlesDrive My Car” from the Rubber Soul album. Here’s what to listen for.

1. Listen to the pickup notes at the end of the bass phrase during the verse. He doesn’t play it all the time, but it makes for a very funky bass line when he does.

2. Paul plays the bass line of the chorus differently, sometimes even within the same chorus. Sometimes each note is held out, and other times it’s very staccato.

3. The bass track is far from perfect, with a major clam at 1:57 and some minor ones along the way. That said, it took another 10 years or so until production techniques really focused on each individual part and how it interacted with the other elements of the song, as well as how consistently each part was played.

In other words, it’s a great track for its time, but would have been fixed or replayed in today’s production environment.